Posts Tagged ‘Avondale College’

Core Values

Monday, June 20, 2016

PurposeWhat are your organisations’ core values? Not the ones that you say are values, but the ones that actually reflect who you really are?

In a recent article by Nicole Fallon Taylor (read it here) she highlights core values and the role they play in our organisations. Essentially they are the culture of the company, and irrespective of what we might say our organisation does, it is these core values that really matter.

It is certainly one thing to define your core values, and quite another to actually live them out. Saying one thing and doing another is a recipe for disaster in any organisation.

Do you live your values, or simply talk about what you want other people to think they are? The Avondale Business School can help you and your team develop core values – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

Only You Can Make Your Job Meaningful

Monday, June 20, 2016

PurposeMelissa Dahl previews an article in MIT Sloan Management Review (read it here) by Bailey and Madden that explores the failure of bosses who attempt to create meaningfulness on the job for their employees. Surprisingly, the results are usually a fail.

The authors found that leadership has little impact on meaningful moments at work. In contrast, bad management ranks as the number one inhibiter of meaningful work.

Instead, Bailey and Madden have found that it is each individual who makes their work truly meaningful and deeply personal. They cite as examples the office cleaner who finds his work very meaningful, and the corporate CEO who doesn’t.

The conclusion they reach is that it is not up to anyone else to create meaning in your work, it is just up to you.

Are you finding meaning in your work? Perhaps the Avondale Business School can help by working with you to develop your personal leadership and management skills. To find out more, contact Warrick Long at:

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

The Value-Creating Board

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Value creating boardsMcKinsey & Company released earlier this year their latest report into what is a value-creating board. The full report and commentary can be found here, but following is a selection of quotes and highlights and challenges for your board.

Striving Boards:

  • Rate particularly well at strategy and performance management, and want to spend more time each year on strategy
  • An exceptionally strong culture of trust and respect, and board members and the management team constructively challenge each other
  • The chair runs the meeting well, seeking feedback after meetings
  • Spend on average 41 days per year on board duties

Complacent Boards:

  • Only 9 percent of directors rate their boards as effective at ensuring the company has a viable CEO successor
  • They struggle to embrace feedback and rarely engage in any form of evaluations
  • Spend on average 28 days per year on board duties

Ineffective Boards:

  • Few report a culture of trust and respect in the boardroom
  • Few directors seek out any information on their own
  • About 1 percent say they received sufficient director induction training
  • Spend on average 32 days per year on board duties

What type of board do you have? Is it time to review how you function and aim to become a striving board? The Avondale Business School can assist your board to become a high performing board – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

The Psychologist Guide to Leadership

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Leadership 3The British Psychological Society just published their guide to leadership (Read it here), based on input from their members. It is a very interesting read, and here are a few of the main points in summary:

  1. Leadership is about ‘us’ and for all of us
    • That is, the role of leadership is to ‘Reflect, Represent and Realise’ collective aspirations.
  2. Be an example for employee wellbeing
    • You need to be the healthy role model for your employees, and to end toxic work practices.
  3. Good meetings demonstrate good leadership
    • Think carefully about the meetings you hold, both whether you need to hold them, and are they done well – respect your employees time.
  4. Develop your leadership potential away from the workplace
    • Have a life away from work, and develop your talents there as well. Everyone will be better for it.
  5. Don’t underestimate the impact of emotional intelligence
    • Research shows that emotional intelligence is critical to the successful performance of individuals at the executive level.
  6. Embrace a new era of management styles
    • Get on board with divesting autonomy and granting more flexibility.

How many of these are you achieving? It is time to take a look at your leadership? The Avondale Business School can help you and your team develop leadership skills – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

Performance Management Reinvented

Monday, May 23, 2016

Performance ManagementJust in case you didn’t know, the traditional annual performance management discussion is on the way out. An increasing number of companies are ditching the time-consuming, subjective and demotivating practices for new ways of managing employee performance.

McKinsey & Company have published an excellent article on this issue (read it here), complete with examples of companies that are implementing these new practices. Interestingly no one is suggesting the idea of performance management be abandoned, merely that it needs to morph into a much more effective process. Amongst the ideas raised in the article are the following:

  • Rethinking what constitutes employee performance
    • Instead of focussing on the middle ground, identify clear over performers and underperformers
    • Highlight and encourage exemplar performances
  • Automating real-time analyses
    • Using apps for continual crowd-sourced performance data throughout the year
    • Collected in real-time which is not only fresh, but enables managers to draw on actual evidence
  • Severing the link between evaluation and compensation
    • Link compensation to the performance of the company, not the individual
    • Studies indicate that employees value meaning (seeing purpose and value in work) as the most important factor.

In handling performance management, it is now coaching rather than evaluating that is the key. The article list three practices that seem to deliver the results, these being changing the language of feedback, providing constant crowdsourced vignettes, and focussing discussions on the future rather than what happened in the past.

Performance management is changing, and companies that succeed will be the ones that change with it. The Avondale Business School can help you keep ahead in performance management. To find out how, simply contact Warrick Long on:

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

Rediscovering Authentic Leadership

Monday, May 23, 2016

What is an authentic leader? Back in 2003 Bill George coined the term and wrote the seminal book about it. He defines authentic leaders as genuine, moral and character-based leaders. However, in more recent times other authors have challenged this, claiming that it masks rigidity, insensitivity and a resistance to change.Authentic Leadership

In a recent HBR online article (read it here), George fires back at the critics and reemphasises that there are five demonstrable qualities of authentic leaders:

  • Understanding their purpose
  • Practicing solid values
  • Leading with heart
  • Establishing connected relationships
  • Demonstrating self-discipline

George goes on to discuss these qualities and gives examples of what they look like in practice. In the article he also reports on an update to his original research and particularly emphasises that authentic leaders are constantly growing and learning from their leadership experiences.

Authentic leadership has taken a battering of recent times, however George’s new research brings it back to the fore as a credible and desirable leadership style. After all, who wouldn’t want to be led by someone who is authentic? The Avondale Business School can help you and your team develop leadership skills – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

Running Better Meetings

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Meetings 2It is a common fallacy that organisations that have a lot of meetings must be good at meetings. In reality, they typically just perpetuate the embedded meeting culture that is often not very effective. There is a wealth of resources on running effective meetings, and one of the latest offerings comes from Renee Cullinan in the April 29 2016 edition of HBR.org (Read it here), in which Cullinan identifies three of the biggest areas for improving meetings.

 

  1. Including Introverts

Noisy people are not necessarily smarter, they just think out loud and so create the impression they are. Introverts are typically much quieter and process information internally. Consequently it is very common in meetings for the loud people to dominate discussion and reach a conclusion or consensus before the quiet ones have had a chance to contribute, leaving the decision-making process the poorer as a result.

Cullinan advocates a number of potential solutions for this, one of which is to circulate the meeting material prior to the meeting, thereby giving the introverts an opportunity to read and process the material prior to the meeting, and to then come to the meeting prepared to contribute.

  1. Remote Team Members

People who join meetings via teleconference often find it hard to contribute and report feeling left out. It is not uncommon for them to zone out and do other work during the meeting.

Again, Cullinan has a number of worthwhile suggestions for inclusion, one of which is to use video technology as often as possible instead of teleconference, thereby giving people a visual reference and ability to be seen.

  1. Women

Numerous research efforts have proven that during meetings women are far more likely to be interrupted and their ideas taken less seriously.

Amongst the proposed solutions from Cullinan is to create a culture of not allowing any interruptions, irrespective of who is speaking, and to “call it when you see it”.

The Avondale Business School can help you ensure your meetings are highly productive – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

Stretch Goals are Detrimental

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Stretch GoalsMany organisations use stretch goals, those “seemingly impossible” goals to motivate employees to reach beyond what they thought was possible. However, a recent study by Lemone, Blum and Roman published in February 2016 casts some doubt over the effectiveness of stretch goals. You can find the full article here.

Lemone et al studied the effectiveness of stretch goals in the running of organisations that deal with substance use disorders. Coming out of their research was the finding that in organisations with poor capacity, stretch goals made no impact, and in organisations that were strong stretch goals were found to be harmful and demotivating.

Overall they concluded that stretch goals are harmful for most organisations and that a better approach is to negotiate challenging but seemingly not impossible goals with the staff, which allowed for smaller but more frequent wins to be achieved. Essentially it means staff can have an increased expectation of achievement, which is much more motivating and means it is more likely to occur than stretch goals.

Is it time you re-evaluated the goals of your organisation to see whether they are motivating or de-motivating your employees? The Avondale Business School can advise your organisation on being effective in these areas – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

It Doesn’t Have to be a Sacrifice

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Corporate Social ResponsibilityUp until recently, much of the discussion surrounding corporate social responsibility puts it as either profits or being socially responsible, but not both. And on face value it might appear that way, however more and more organisations are recognising that the two are not mutually exclusive.

Studies are showing that investing in socially responsible ways of doing business are generating longer term profitability and generating higher returns for investors. A recent article in the Huffington Post Australia outlined 10 companies that are in fact achieving this. You can read the full article here.

Some of the ways these companies are achieving social responsibility include:

  • Zero waste
  • Valuing aging workers
  • Women in leadership
  • Environmental responsibility

Think about your organisation – is it demonstrably socially responsible? Should it be? Maybe this week think of one way your organisation can take some positive steps towards being a model corporate citizen in the area of corporate social responsibility.

The Avondale Business School can advise your organisation on being effective in these areas – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168

7 Secrets of ‘Servant Leadership’ That Will Lead You to Success

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Servant LeadershipI’ve never been comfortable with the term ‘servant leadership’, despite writing a Masters paper on it that scored very well (the lecturer loved servant leadership so I just told him what he wanted to hear!). I wonder if it was because I had not seen it modelled very effectively, and in more recent times I must admit that I am seeing more and more. When it is done well, it creates an environment of trust and confidence where people flourish and organisations gain the benefits from that.

Writing recently in the Inc. online edition, Peter Economy identified the 7 secrets of servant leadership. You can read the full article here, but as a teaser, here are a few of them in simple point form:

  1. Every person has value and deserves civility, trust, and respect
  2. People can accomplish much when inspired by a purpose beyond themselves
  3. Lovingly hold themselves and others accountable for their commitments

Once you read the full article, it’s time to reflect on your own leadership and see if there are some aspects of servant leadership that you can introduce. Maybe think of just one you could try this week.

The Avondale Business School can help you with servant leadership in your organisation – find out how by contacting Warrick Long at the Avondale Business School.

E: Warrick.long@avondale.edu.au

P: 02 4980 2168