Posts Tagged ‘Anzac’

Lest we forget

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Avondale honours Anzacs

Avondale College of Higher Education president Dr Ray Roennfeldt honoured those who served and died in military operations for their country by laying a wreath at the war memorial during the Anzac Service in Morisset, April 25.

With drum major and senior lecturer in physics Dr Lynden Rogers again wielding the mace, Avondale Brass Band followed the veterans in South Lake Macquarie RSL Sub Branch’s Anzac Day march down Dora Street to the memorial at the Morisset Country Club.

A number of Avondale staff members are members of the band, including Associate Professor Kevin de Berg.

Vocal ensemble Avondale Singers’s performance of “In Flanders Fields” opened the Anzac Service. Director Aleta King then led in the singing of the hymns and of the national anthem.

Dr Ray Roennfeldt lays a wreath at the war memorial. Karen Zeuschner
Dr Ray Roennfeldt lays a wreath at the war memorial. Karen Zeuschner
Dr Lynden Rogers led Avondale Brass Band down Dora Street. Lee Hancock
Dr Lynden Rogers led Avondale Brass Band down Dora Street. Lee Hancock
Associate Professor Kevin de Berg. Sabrina Cruz
Associate Professor Kevin de Berg. Sabrina Cruz
Avondale Singers performs during the Anzac Service. Lagani Gairo
Avondale Singers performs during the Anzac Service. Lagani Gairo
NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail

Fighting Mac

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

The Anzac hero who saved not took life

Associate Professor Daniel Reynaud
Dean
Faculty of Arts and Theology
Avondale College of Higher Education

Captain William McKenzie.

Ask Australians to name the most famous Anzac of World War I and most will probably answer, “Simpson, the man with the donkey.” While Simpson is a household name, the soldiers who fought in the war would give a different answer: Captain William McKenzie.

McKenzie served as chaplain of the 4th Battalion. An enthusiastic Christian minister who stood for evangelism and against booze, brothels and bad language, he might seem an unlikely candidate for most famous Anzac of the Great War. But in 1920, McKenzie’s popularity reached its zenith—it would take him more than three hours to reach Sydney Town Hall from his office on Goulburn Street, just three blocks away. People mobbed him just to shake his hand.

A Scottish-born Salvation Army officer, McKenzie’s tireless energy on the soldiers’ behalf earned their respect, while his charismatic personality won their love. He was a born leader with a tremendous sense of humour, a childlike innocence, integrity and constant cheerfulness.

In Cairo, McKenzie not only preached against the brothels but also went to the red-light district at night and literally dragged men out, putting them on a tram back to camp. He expected a knife in the ribs from the brothel owners for ruining their business.

On Gallipoli, McKenzie won the undying respect of the Anzacs. Like other chaplains, he conducted burial services, often under shell fire. But he went further, finding chocolates for each man, or cutting steps into a steep part of a track at night.

At the Battle of Lone Pine, McKenzie should have been in the rear trenches, but he followed the charge, carrying just a spade. He needed it: over the next few weeks, he sorted the living from the dead and buried 450 men. For his actions, McKenzie received the Military Cross.

McKenzie led something like 2000 to 3000 men to Christ during the war. This is what one of his letters, written in Egypt, records: “I realise the nearness of His presence and something of the sweetness and power of His great salvation. I confess that I cried myself to sleep last night or in the early hours of the morning after long meditation over the sacrifices and death of the Christ of God. This I think helped me to read the scriptures and preach the truth better at this morning’s parade . . . when for half an hour some 2000 of us there sang of the Cross and its meaning and pondered over the story once again.”

When McKenzie returned to Australia in 1918, thousands came to see him in every town and city he visited. In Sydney, his feet never touched the ground from the train to the town hall. In following years, at Anzac Day parades, his hand bleed from the sheer number of handshakes he gave.

Some have said the Anzacs were not religious. Perhaps, but McKenzie noted on Gallipoli that many showed an interest in God. He said: “Men realise as never before that the most manly thing to do is to worship and glorify God.”

More air time for Anzacs

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Seven to screen academic’s TV episode

Brenton Stacey
Public relations officer
Avondale College of Higher Education
Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia

The Seven Network in Australia will broadcast another Anzac Day-themed episode produced in part by an Avondale academic for a Christian television program.

Fighting Mac: the story of William McKenzie is a half-hour episode written for It Is Written Oceania by Associate Professor Daniel Reynaud, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Theology at Avondale College of Higher Education. It will screen on Seven’s digital channel 7TWO at 2.00 PM on April 25.

“Mac became the most famous Anzac by the end of the war,” says Daniel. He never carried a gun or fired a shot. “Through their selfless deeds and heroic ministering, the Anzac chaplains gained the respect and admiration of the soldiers—not by taking life, but by saving it.”

It Is Written will promote an offer of a free monograph written by Daniel and called Faith of the Anzacs during the broadcast of the episode.

Presenter Gary Kent and Daniel Reynaud on location at Gallipoli.

Daniel travelled to Gallipoli in western Turkey with the It Is Written crew to serve as the historical consultant and to appear on camera for each of six episodes. He wrote the episodes. Seven and its affiliates screened a compilation of the first two episodes—as an Angel Award-winning special, also called Faith of the Anzacs—on Anzac Day last year. In New South Wales and Queensland, this preceded the traditional Australian Rules Football match between Collingwood and Essendon. More than 1000 people—a record for It Is Written—requested Daniel’s monograph after viewing the special.

Daniel’s interest lies in the Anzac legend and its representation in early Australian films. He is the author of Celluloid Anzacs: The Great War Through Australian Cinema and The Hero of the Dardanelles and Other World War One Silent Dramas. The former served as the basis of a speech Daniel presented at the Shine of Remembrance in Melbourne last Wednesday (April 11).

Daniel’s work with the National Film and Sound Archive in the recovery and partial reconstruction of several silent films, including The Hero of the Dardanelles (1915), Australia’s first Gallipoli movie, also served him well during a panel discussion on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s RN Drive program the following day (April 12). Host Waleed Aly explored with Daniel and two other guests, one a University of Melbourne lecturer and the other the host of Radio National’s Movie Time, how and why our understanding of history is shaped by the movies.

 

Record response to Faith of the Anzacs

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

More than 1000 people have requested an Avondale College lecturer’s monograph written to coincide with the broadcast of an Anzac Day-themed special on television.

Presenter Gary Kent and Daniel Reynaud shoot Faith of the Anzacs on location at Gallipoli.

The response to the offer of Associate Professor Daniel Reynaud’s Faith of the Anzacs is 10 times greater than the response the producer of the special, It Is Written Oceania, receives for the Bible studies and DVDs it promotes during the regular broadcast of its program across all networks and times.

The Seven Network in Australia broadcast the special, also called Faith of the Anzacs, at midday on Anzac Day in New South Wales and Queensland, half an hour before the traditional Australian Rules Football match between Collingwood and Essendon. The special aired in other states and territories before the Sunrise program at 6.30 AM the same day.

Avondale honours Anzacs

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Avondale College president Dr Ray Roennfeldt laid a wreath during the Anzac Day memorial service in Morisset. Credit: Ann Stafford.

The rain came again but the band played on during the Anzac Day march through Morisset. Sound familiar?

With drum major Dr Lynden Rogers again wielding the mace, Avondale Brass Band led the march down Dora Street to the war memorial at the Morisset Country Club, where during the memorial service the band, conducted by lecturer in music Sharon Tolhurst, and sessional lecturer Sue Hart led the singing of the national anthem and several hymns.

Drum major Dr Lynden Rogers led Avondale Brass Band during the Anzac Day march in Morisset. Credit: Hannah Orman.

Avondale College president Dr Ray Roennfeldt also laid a wreath during the service.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Teaching student Amber Lewis joined the band to lead the singing during the dawn service earlier in the day.

Seven to air Faith of the Anzacs

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Brenton Stacey
Public relations officer
Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia

The Seven Network in Australia will broadcast an Anzac Day-themed special produced in part by an Avondale College lecturer for a Christian television program.

Faith of the Anzacs is a half-hour episode written for It Is Written Oceania by Associate Professor Daniel Reynaud, dean of the Faculty of Arts. It will air on Seven and its affiliates in New South Wales and Queensland at 12.00 PM on April 25. It airs in other states and territories at 6.30 AM the same day.

The special highlights the seldom recognised role of faith and religion in the story of Gallipoli. “Many of the men found comfort in scripture, prayer and song, and the mateship of faith of those who trusted in God,” says Daniel. “This story unearths the forgotten stories of the faith of Anzac chaplains and soldiers, stories of genuine heroism, faith and courage.”

It Is Written will promote an offer of a free monograph written by Daniel and called Faith of the Anzacs during the broadcast of the special.

Daniel travelled to Gallipoli in western Turkey with the It Is Written crew to serve as the historical consultant and to appear on camera for each of six episodes. He wrote the episodes. They will air on the Australian Christian Channel, Channel Seven in Australia, EMTV in Papua New Guinea, the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s Hope Channel and TV2 in New Zealand around Anzac Day this year and over the next two years.

Daniel’s interest lies in the Anzac legend and its representation in early Australian films. He is the author of Celluloid Anzacs: The Great War Through Australian Cinema and The Hero of the Dardanelles and Other World War One Silent Dramas. He has also worked with the National Film and Sound Archive in the recovery and partial reconstruction of several silent films, including The Hero of the Dardanelles (1915), Australia’s first Gallipoli movie.

Links
Map: Gallipoli